3 Things You Need to Know About Collier County’s Water Quality

red chairs and umbrella on the beach in Naples, Florida1 RED TIDE IS TEMPORARY
Red Tide (Karenia Brevis) is a naturally occurring saltwater algae bloom that may collect on the beach during a very hot and wet summer. Several federal and state water quality projects are in place to reduce its severity by controlling future algae overgrowth.
NOTE: The blue/green algae blooms (Cyanobacteria) laying on the surface of freshwater canals in Lee County have never been present in Collier County canals.

2 OUR BEACHES ARE NOT COVERED IN DEAD FISH
Despite videos circulating on social media of dead fish piled across the beach, Collier County beaches are not experiencing that level of fish loss. In fact, no large whales, sharks, or porpoise (dolphins) have been found dead on Collier shores or in canals.
NOTE: The recent accumulation of dead fish in Moorings Bay (Oct. 7th) was a result of Hurricane Michael, which created very high tide levels that pushed canal water into nearby sewer pipes. As the tide receded, a Cylindrotheca algae bloom formed that killed fish living in the bay. This is a different algae than what causes red tide.

3 SUPPORT INCREASED WATER TESTING IN COLLIER
Steps to protect water habitats from high nutrient output cannot be taken without proper environmental testing. But budget cuts have reduced water testing to monitor nutrient levels in Collier County.
TIP: Ask your elected government officials to increase funding for future testing or donate to a registered marine or water-quality agency that has the ability to perform the tests and monitor for irregularities.

From  NABOR Water Quality Newsletter October 2018 PDF

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